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and the great government consulting as they pick the products to bring a lot of innovation to san francisco. cory? give cory a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you, chris. thank you so much for all of your hard work, chris. none of this could be possible without your efforts. good evening. the good government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different re
in san francisco. she holds a degree in government, from claire mont college and a policy. >> good evening, everyone, candidates. >> good evening. >> this year we have two candidates for state assembly state 19, michael brior and phil tim. >> they will answer questions that you in the audience submit as well as the questions submitted to the league of women voters. in addition, the viewers from the senior center may submit questions on-line. the time keepers will hold up a yellow card to signify to the candidates that they have 15 seconds remaining and hold up a red card when it is time to stop. >> both have asked the supporters to be respectful of the candidate and the audience and to maintain the quiet during the forum, i also ask you to respect this commitment, please. >> you all have many important decision to make on november 6th, and today's forum will give you the opportunity to ask questions to help you make your decisions. now, let's begin. >> our first question is a very general... actually i want to start with one here that is from the richmond senior center sent in on-l
to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations, we have a workshop coming up. that is helpful for those of you who are looking to access the committee on a durable basis. >> also, on behalf of leader pelosi, i want to thank our panel and her staff. we are tenants in this building. i apologize for the security situation that happened upstairs. if you have concerns about it, please come and see me. i would like to convey those to the landlord here so that it does not happen again. thank you. >> jennifer wagner. jnny first joined the league in san francisco in 2001 and has since volunteered in many roles at the local, regional and state and nation levels she currently volunteered as the president of the league of woman voters of california, and is a small business owner here in san francisco. she holds a degree in
have done through office and to make government much more receptive and efficient. >> that leads into the question about civic engagement. it is critical that people are engaged to have a safe, strong and vibrant state. what have you done and what will you do to encourage the kind of participation that you are talking about. >> i think that transparency and disclosure are some of the main reasons that we have so little citizen participation, that is one of the reasons that i started up we stand san francisco it is an on-line society to engage citizen and order people to get more involved in government so that we cannot just have a conversation here, where people could make it, if people could be part of that conversation on-line, just like all of the folks at the richmond senior sen center, so they can participate. i think that what is lacking in government at times is really making sur that citizens have the information, and they are digestable information and so few people when they pay property taxes one of the biggest checks they write every year, most people could never des
. however we have what the government has called a ponzi scheme and so there needs to be definitely a serious readjustment of the priorities in terms of making it more of a private sector-funded type of pension benefit program going forward. >> thank you. >> mr. leno? >> let me also thank both leagues for bringing us together today and also it is a real pleasure to be here with miss dillan who is a great respectful of her party and an activist in the community. as i think that most californians know that we have spent a lot of time dealing with the issue of pension reform for the public sector workers and i think that we have reached a point where we can going forward deal with pensions in a much more sustain able fashion so that we won't see cities in particular having upwards of 25, 30 percent of the general fund having to go to pension obligations. of course, those promises already made must legally be adhered to. i have also said in a lot of time in this past year, looking at private sector employees in publicly traded corporations, who have seen their benefits wiped out and in
and transparency to government and emphasis on education and those are all priorities. and i want to bring to sacramento. i always have been engaged in civic activities and my first campaign was six and senator kennedy. and i worked on al gore i was an intern in his office and volunteered in his campaign and i volunteered in new hampshire for obama and for nusome and lee. i have been on the library commission and i have a public service history in my family. my grandfather used to work for the school board. my dad is on the u.s. supreme court and so i believe that the pinnacle of a person's career is to make an impact on public service and when you see faith in our system of government dropping off a cliff, like it has, going from 80 percent to 20 percent, you see, something is wrong. something is not working. and when you have politics as usual, in sacramento, not being honest, not being transparent, not dealing with the problems and challenges of the future, we say that we have to change that. and so i want to bring that independent perspective, and that personal honesty and that willing
of the voters of california and a small business owner san francisco. and olds a degree in government and a diploma in public policy from the university of edenburo >> thank you very much >> good evening, everyone, this election we have candidates for state senate district eleven, miss additionally, viewers from the it, brooke man community center will submit questions on-line. the time keepers in the first row, will hold up a yellow card to signify to the candidates that they have 15 seconds remaining and will hold up a red card when it is time to stop. both candidates have agreed to ask their supporters in the audience to be respectful of the other candidate and others in the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i also ask you respect this commitment. you have many important decisions to make on november 6th. today's forum gives you the opportunity to ask questions to help you make decisions. now let's begin. >> we will start with question number one, miss difficult on. >> retire aoes in the public and private sectors are faced with nrets to benefits from under funded pe
because we, not just government, the whole community came together. as much as anything else we do, all this work gives people hope and makes a difference. you are going to hear from a lot of different people today. i am going to step out and come up -- back. if you do not know some people, take the opportunity toç get to know othersç outside of your aa of comfort. take that time. you make a difference. people in this room make a huge difference. for the work you do each and every day, thank you. thank you for what you do, because you truly make a difference in people's lives. ççthanks. [applause] we will get more information on that as we get to the launch itself. i would like to move on to the next part of the agenda. we're going to have some detailed discussions of the framework. i would like to introduce the deputy associate administrator for the theme office of response and recovery. [applause] >> good morning. we have to keep this going. this is kind of the morning of talking before we get into the nuts and bolts of where we're really here. i want to start by thanking nanc
of the separate body governed by a five-member commission appointed by the appo inted by t hemayor with two specific seats for the districts. the primary districts for these areas; important for the board and approved by the mayor that the district included actual residents and stakeholders the successor agency commission. s in terms of the planning commission role, it is an change of the legislation, unchanged pre-dissolution when the board adopted resolution 1112 the creators oversight, that has been peeled off because state law has required it and the state department of finance has required that this oversight body simply just do fiduciary oversight, review and approve the payment schedules and other required functions under state law and a separate body governed by the structure under the city and county of san francisco, the board appointment -- rather the mayor appointments of those five seats goals of the normal board appointment processes all other commissions and boards. the board retains its authority over the redevelopment plans. pursuant to the contracts in place. a pr
on this budget it's senseless and it's just more government putting the throats -- putting the boots on the throat of the average day citizen. >> all right. thank you sir. mr. yee. >> so let's face it. let's not make our parking meters the atm for the city. i mean we really need to support the notion that we don't want meters to operate on sunday, especially in our district, district seven. the business corridors need access to customers and when you charge on sundays and parking meters the same people shopping and at restaurants they're going to go somewhere else. they're going to go to stonestown and the malls and if you believe in the small businesses in the community then we need to support the notion that we're not going to allow for parking meters to operate on sunday. >> okay. thank you mr. yee. mr. bye. >> i completely oppose sunday and late night meters and our district. i agree with norman that it really will literally drive people out of the area and down to south city or some other area in which people want t come to this part of town for the small town experience
agency of state government to cut specific regulations and red tape. we thought fracking was such a big deal. we have a huge amount of natural gas. horizontal drilling and fracking, natural gas has great potential benefits. much cleaner than coal. it is $1.75 per gallon equivalent to less-expensive. it keeps jobs here and does not send billions of dollars to a dictatorship. there is fear about what happens and we sat down with halliburton and the oil and gas services companies. we understand they have trade secrets. we showed what the ingredients are and it took a six months but we got the environmental defense fund to claim victory and have halliburton claim victory. here is a transparency, set of regulations that will protect the public and settle down all the hysteria and kirk -- furor about fracking. i did it when i was a kid diyala this. how do we get past that fear and uncertainty and create some sort of predictability to business needs? that became a symbol for our issues. to find the appropriate compromise so we can get on to the next problem. >> would you like to bring us up-to
with residents and businesses. when residents feel threatened by the government they don't trust the government and we need less of the head butting and yes the city needs money but we can't do it on the backs of small business and the threats to residents and i completely oppose the meters on sundays and late nights. >> mr. crowley. >> in district seven i think it's necessary to dismiss this idea all together and let's not forget the holidays and they hit them as well. a one size approach doesn't fit this and i suggest the parking lots at the ball field and we do dynamic pricing and that is one solution that is dense and know they're going to pay for parking and looking for solutions to fit their car in for free. only in areas where there is the retail wrap that should happen but in district seven it's a disincentive for the merchants. >> we are good at shooting the goose and in the foot and muni says we have a deficit let's gouge the drivers. are you going to drive anywhere? no. you're going somewhere else and where is that revenue that we need? and by the way give free passes to youth a
city government into the business of making home loans. this is part of what brought on the economic crisis at the federal level, fannie mae and freddie mac giving out home loans to people who couldn't afford to buy and later had their houses foreclosed. we don't know what's going to happen in the housing market for the next 30 years. i think it's foolish to set aside increasing set amounts of money for the next 3 decades when we know right now that there's thousands of people living on the streets. why not just build as many affordable units now as possible and do that by getting government out of the way with all its red tape and regulations and taxes and union work rules that increase the cost of housing. that would be a better way to get affordable housing, not bringing back this redevelopment agency with its legacy of driving african americans out of the fillmore and they had slated more than half the bay area for redevelopment before they were shut down. >> anything you'd like to add, peter? >> there's a number of assertions from my opponent that are based in a misunderstand
>> thank you for joining us tonight. i am the government policy director at spur. it is my distinct pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects t
be voting against this measure? >> originally it was all odd year elections for city government. the main focus was to have a lot of elections spread out so people would pay attention. that was the idea of the 1932 charter. it is good in the sense given the history of san francisco and, frankly, a lot of governmental problems we had historically, getting people to pay attention to city government has been very important. we had 1901 to 1907 a group called roof ring, they described the 18 supervisors then on the board as, quote, so corrupt they would eat the paint off the walls. that's the reason why we want people to pay attention to their city government. frankly, new england city governments are the small ones and tall hall government is the best of all. we can't do that. but we can give people is exposure to city government, it avoids a lot of problems. we have had a lot of mistakes. (inaudible) was not built when they put in the underground, that caused umpty million dollars to correct. >> we hope this discussion was informative. for more information on this and other ballot m
, supervisor. thanks for having me. proposition d is a good government measure that will increase voter turnout in our elections for city attorney and treasurer, two very important offices, and will also save the city 4.2 million dollars every 4 years. right now we elect our city attorney and treasurer in a very, very low turnout odd year election where they are the only two offices on the ballot. and turnout is always extremely low in that election. and it costs us over $4 million dollars to hold that election. proposition d would move the city attorney and treasurer elections to be on the same ballot as the mayor, which is a much myer turn jut election, so more people would be voting for city attorney and treasurer and every time we don't hold that very low turnout odd year election separately for city attorney and treasurer, we'll save 4.2 million dollars. prop d was put on the ballot unanimously by the board of supervisors and it's been endorsed overwhelmingly by both the democratic and republican party. >> dr. faulkner, do you think this is a good idea. >> it has several problems. the orig
government and it's our open government that you the voters have voted for so for four months the board is doing whatever they want to do, and there is no process for a check and balance, and that cannot go on while they make back room deals. they strategize and leave and go to other appointments that they are elected to, so with corruption here at city hall and we must face it. we must deal with it. >> thank you. mr. lagos. >> yes thank you cheryl. the number one issue for me is major land use development and affordable housing. i think they're codependent issues. the reason why i say this is because we have had a policy in the city for the last 40 or 50 years of transforming a lot of the working class, middle class neighborhoods into basically upper middle class, upper class neighborhoods and in my opinion it's destroying our city and there needs to be a stop put to it, and so that's what i see as the major problem here and the major issue which i would tackle if i were elected in november. >> all right thank you sir. mr. rogers. >> yes. i think the most important thing that cou
. the government can't and should not shoulder theç entire challenge ofçç responseç, recovery, and prepared this. prior to theirç administration, nobody would really say that out loud. we became an agency trying to be everything to everybody at the worst possible time for all of us. it is their leadership and tenacity to hone in one this one psychological culture shift in speaking about earthquakes that is a real seismic shift in the way we look at things. we are honored to have him here for a few minutes today. the deputy administrator. [applause] ç>> good morning. it is truly a pleasure to be back here in san francisco. i was here a few months ago for the anniversary of theç loma pr ieto earthquake. in talking to a lot of folks and listening to the mayor, the mayor getsç it. i come from the city in the çnortheast. i spent a little bit of time in boston. i had a career before i came to fema to 0.5 years ago. boston and san francisco are similar in many ways. you have a mayor that is passionate about emergency management. you have a group of people in emergency managementç not o
in 2006 after the government reported it contained, band heavy metal. hundreds of women demanding refunds lined up down the block. here is an example of them busting down the headquarters in shanghai. women do not want toxic bad metals. in their $100 skin cream. unfortunately, the government and procter and gamble was freaked out about this. then it was announceable, just a little bit of toxic metals, don't worry. they put the products back on the shelf and back on the market. china is the no. 1 growth market for procter and gamble. have quotes where she says china is no. 2 mark and going for no. 1 and do it by marketing our products to millions of villages across china. that is the mentality of the company, all about growth and convincing us that we need more products. these are also in the most toxic categories and increasingly marketed to younger and younger girls. this is an example of a 5 or 7 year old on the cover of a skin, hair relaxer. these are ratings, that is the most toxic hair relaxers and no. 1 is a kid's product. then for hair dye, younger and younger girls are getting
through the federal government is something that needs to be reformed. >> thank you. >> ending with the theme of public safety, our final question, is that the state proposition 36 seeks to amend california law to provide that a life sentence should not be imposed for a third felony conviction unless it is for a serious or violent felony, and what is your position. >> i spent a lot of time my ten years in legislation working on criminal justice reform to make sure that we have saner drug laws and we don't see the spending grow from 5.2 to over ten percent surpassing the amount that we spend on higher education as a completely wrong track that we are on. thanks to corn brown we have turned the corner and with realignment we will be reducing that percentage of funding on the criminal justice so that we can spend it on education which is the best crime preventive tool known to human kind. i am a strong supporter of prop 36 and i supported the earlier version in 2004 when only because of wise that arnold schwarzenegger said in a television commercial that it was mathematically impo
of the choice that was made to put in combined sewer systems. narrator: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is
for coverage from the state or federal government? do you agree with funding this for employees who spend less for their employees health care than what the city believes is adequate? >> yes. i think it's important that we continue in this direction. i was one of those persons who grew up -- i mean my grandmother raised me and my brothers and she worked as a maid and couldn't afford health care. and luckily we had medicare and we were able to go to the doctor and the dentist. i still have my same dentist who has been my dentist since i actually had teeth. i just think it's great that kids and people who don't have access to health care have access to health care. we need to look at ways to move into that direction and i think san francisco has definitely led the way for our president to move forward with obamacare and i'm excited about that and i think we can find more innovative ways to fund this. part of that is taking the fees from the employers who have those fees who aren't using it for reimbursement and other costs that we take those fees and use them for appropriate purposes. >> mr
substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held companies. man: the private sector has learned to become very efficient, and frequently a municipality can save themselves a significant amount of money by bringing in a private company. this is not true in all cases. there are some exceptionally well-run municipalities, but they do have to deal with a city go
government. we could not have done this without the 9-1/2 million dollars of recovery monies that we got through the federal government. we have herb schultz here from the department of human services federal government. they've been really at the forefront with us. certainly dan bernel representing leader pelosi. she has been really a stalwart fighter. when everybody was cutting funds, she preserved that money for us. and, of course, i've got to put out a big, big thanks to president obama because without that recovery money, we wouldn't be here talking about this today. so, thank you, president obama. (applause) >> and leader pelosi, federal partners working with our local folks here. that's how we get these things done. and then i want to just give a special shout out to dr. colvax who is here. i know he gave such you an incredible dedication when he was the head of the hiv unit while he was here. we're changing stories now that he's at the head of the national office on hiv policy and the national policy office. how wonderful he thinks of san francisco now and he has to go and intera
was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in
governance that will improve our city college system and protect this accreditation. to that end, i have given very careful consideration about who to appoint to fill this vacancy at such a critical time in our city college history. we need somebody who shares my vision of reform and some who will make the tough choices ahead. today i am proud to appoint rodrigo santos as the new trustee of the san francisco city college. [applause] not only to make good good decisions, correct ones, but also to complete the term of trusty marks. rodrigo is an individual that brings a wealth of knowledge and fiscal and managerial expertise, but he is committed and passionate about education and educating all of our youth, just as he has done with his incredible twins and with the help of jenny. rodrigo has been and is based on business owner. he has had a history of community service. he has volunteered on a number of different conditions, including the san francisco building inspection commission, the former president of that commission, but i think most importantly he has been an incredible part of our
the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is that the verse you point coming together to focus -- it is that diverse viewpoint coming together to focus and figure out with the public what it is that we should do, that it is time well, well thought out, and what we need to do to show the rest of the country that this city can work itself out of the economic doldrums and into presenting hope and economic opportunity for everybody, no matter their backgrounds. we also reflect our regional values in this city in many different ways. we want to continue selecting people who will make sure government and all of our programs are open to everybody. i want to thank each and every one of the people in front of me today representing the different bodies we are
we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is that the verse you point coming together to focus -- it is that diverse viewpoint coming together to focus and figure out with the public what it is that we should do, that it is time well, well thought out, and what we need to do to show the rest of the country that this city can work itself out of the economic doldrums and into presenting hope and economic opportunity for everybody, no matter their backgrounds. we also reflect our regional values in this city in many different ways. we want to continue selecting people who will make sure government and all of our programs are open to everybody. i want to thank each and every one of the people in front of me today representing the different bodies we are about t
is broadcast live on san francisco government television, sfgtv cable channel 78 and dvd's of this meeting are available for purchase directly from sfgtv thank you for your attention. at this point in time we will conduct our swearing in process. if you intend to testify at any of tonight's hearings and wish to have the board give your testimony evidencary weight, please stand, raise your right hand and say i do after you have been sworn in or affirmed. please note that any member of the public may speak without taking this oath pursuant to the rights under the sunshine ordinance in the administrative code. thank you. (witnesses sworn). >> thank you. president wong, members of the board , we have one house keeping this evening, that has to do with item 5, appeal no. 095, concerning the house on lans street. any public comment? seeing none, mr. pacheco, call the roll please. >> on that motion from commissioner lazarus to continue item 5-11095 to the call of chair, the board's indefinite calendar, on that motion, the vote is 4-0. this matter is continued to the call of chair. >> thank y
francisco city government was off the backs of everyday residents. [ applause ] >> i like that. thank you. >> all right. next question. san francisco's transportation inserve drivers, bicyclists and transit uses. bicyclists are not charged for the privilege of using or parking on public roadways. mr. davis, mr. everett and miss selby should the city assess fees on bicycle owners to pay for transportation improvements? >> i don't think so and i will tell you why because the city is moving in a direction that i think they should be which is encouraging more people to get out of their cars and to get onto bikes and to use our streets and walk the streets. you know, i think we need to be visionary about getting and meeting our goals. we have a goal of 20% of all trips in san francisco being taken on a bike by 2020. the bike coalition, which is one of my endorsements, as well district 5 group have been advocating for this connecting the city plan, the bike coalition for cross town bikeways to make our streets safer for bike riders. i think we need to move more in that direction and assessing
francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans they are looking for, so i will try hard to bring the brightest minds in this room so you can effectively fix their range and learn more about what you can do better to fix your business plan and what it is they are looking for. first of all, i will introduce everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of
together. we can talk about regulation and pension and taxes and the government. a lot of that is [inaudible] a survey said housing prices are too high and that is a negative factor on recruitment. i thought, maybe we can bring the prices down. foreclosure works magic. i do not think you want that. you want rising wealth which could translate into a rising houses -- housing prices. you can increase density and breakdown similar rules, you get more people. there's a lot of things. as i drove down here from oakland cut -- oakland, i saw those cars in the ordinary lanes. one person per car. you have this one person with all this steel and plastic and oil. it is ridiculous. we're figuring out ways to do that. whether it is high speed rail or electric cars. the first will be rolling off the factory in treatments in the next few months -- in three months and in the next few months. yes, the innovative companies are small. the electric cars -- the tanks are small but so is fairchild or in tal or hewlett-packard -- intel or hewlett-packard or steve jobs. the seats we plant brin
's taking advantage of some $8 million that the federal government gave us to make sure that we don't experience the digital divide that we had experienced a decade ago with the bubble. and so that is aimed at working with city college, with school districts, with our neighborhood youth programs, to evolve a training program that is helped to be created by the tech companies themselves, put a curriculum together. >> great. >> that will allow them to be trained in the right skills, so when they come out of that training they are capable of taking up the jobs. >> so it's key that the tech community generate entry-level jobs for san francisco residents. and so right now we have the top tech employers submitting a list to sf city of the entry-level jobs that they want to hire in the next year. we're going to hand that to ed lee's team at tech sf. they will create curriculum to specifically train for those entry-level jobs that our tech companies. >> it's amazing. do you have -- i have a joke in a minute, but are other mayors coming to you and asking how do i help my own city? >> y
departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is that the verse you point coming together to focus -- it is that diverse viewpoint coming together to focus and figure out with the public what it is that we should do, that it is time well, well thought out, and what we need to do to show the rest of the country that this city can work itself out of the economic doldrums and into presenting hope and economic opportunity for everybody, no matter their backgrounds. we also reflect our regional values in this city in many different ways. we want to continue selecting people who will make sure government and all of our programs are open to everybody. i want to thank each and every one of the people in front of me today representing the different bodies we are about t
of the subscribers. if you think about government- boned journalism compared to the rich, benevolent owner boulders of journalism or the public opening of journalism, i think there is a time now where you do not need quite as much funding as ever, but some of the people who today are seen as barron's -- barons started off with a pretty defined journalistic crusade in their mind, and most of the time in their own minds, it was progressive. i think that the dollars are more available than ever for people with an agenda, but the ability to spot the quality voices is a little bit harder now that they are so numerous. >> there will always be a market for investigative journalism. i do not know that it is the type of financial journalism that was referred to before, but i think that there will always be people willing to also spend the time to listen to that type of reporting or even to read it online. there is no doubt that investigative journalism will continue to flourish. simply as a longer format journalism. yes, i think that that makes a lot of sense in terms of what the audience wants, and it is p
of a drug from felony to misdemeanor. there are 13 other states, and the federal government which already do this and in the 13 other states, we have the data that shows that we get better results, better outcomes, meaning safer communities, and surprisingly the states include not only the large eastern states of pennsylvania and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintended consequences of a felony conviction. consequences that really can cause great damage to a young life for many decades out. the very three things that can keep someone successfully in his or her recovery, access to housing, education and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy,
to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is that the verse you point coming together to focus -- it is that diverse viewpoint coming together to focus and figure out with the public what it is that we should do, that it is time well, well thought out, and what we need to do to show the rest of the country that this city can work itself out of the economic doldrums and into presenting hope and economic opportunity for everybody, no matter their backgrounds. we also reflect our regional values in this city in many different ways. we want to continue selecting people who will make sure government and all of our programs are open to everybody. i want to thank each and every one of the people in front of me today representing the different bodies we are about to make appointments to and thank you for your sacrifice, time, and energ
francisco. number four, we also have lots of funding, government funding, that is supporting capital projects, and for instance 2006 we did not have local hiring for our bond measure. 2011 half a billion dollars worth of work. i want local hiring so that we pay for it. our people that live here should benefit from it. >> all right. thank you. all right. now we're going to come to the candidate's closing statements but i want to remind you if you haven't registered to vote you still have time. please urge everyone to register the deadline is october 22nd and if you moved you need to register again. we're going to do the closing statements in reverse alphabetical order and to the candidates please remember you have -- you got that one right, one minute each. mr. yee we will begin with you. >> i am norman yee and running for supervisor and lived in the district for 27 year scption my two daughters grew up and i am running because i want to grow our economy, make our streets safer and keep our families here, and have been on the school board as a president for eight years now and w
. >> often, we have to govern with our hearts. 80,000 people in the richmond district sometimes have different needs than people in the mission district or bayview hunters point. so often, elected officials and other hard working staff have to make tough decisions. they are political in nature, in many ways, even though people denied that, but at times, many of us are politicians, but we always try to govern with our hearts. >> i have always considered myself having progressive politics. i believe in a vision of people having their needs met. i believe in equity. when people have special needs, we should be considered of that. i also feel that working families in the lowest income population should have a safety net. we should have civil-rights and equality rights for people as well. if that is being a progressive, then i am proud of being a progressive. >> hello, i am with the san francisco parks department serious we are featuring some wonderful locations in your and very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. we are here at the
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